<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=191315034553936&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">

How to make a Whiteboard Video in seven steps.
1. Craft the Message
2. Decide the length
3. The Animation process

Read More

Whiteboard drawing: Include the hand or not? It might seem like a silly question, but we know based on years of experience that clients struggle with this issue frequently, so let’s unpack things a bit and analyze the why, when and how of the matter.

In 1950 the Belgian filmmaker Paul Haesaerts created a remarkable film consisting of the brilliant Spanish artist Pablo Picasso painting on glass. Visite à Picasso (A Visit with Picasso) can be watched online for free, and it’s only twenty minutes long. If you haven’t seen it before, treat yourself—It’s delightful. It’s also all the evidence you’ll need to understand and acknowledge that there is something truly mesmerizing about witnessing the act of creation.

Read More

Animation whiteboard videos in the age of UGC is a topic that begs for attention. The video landscape is ever-changing, and if you’re in need of content (and who isn’t?) it’s important to know what UGC is, the role it plays, and where it stands in relation to whiteboard video.

For the benefit of the uninitiated, UGC stands for “User Generated Content,” or any content created and contributed by the average citizen—as opposed to a big-budget commercial designed by a Madison Avenue advertising firm and shot by the flavor-of-the-month movie director. Viral videos, like, say, “David After Dentist” certainly count as UGC, but in this context, we’re using UGC to refer specifically to photos or videos people contribute to express their enthusiasm for a brand. One example might be the short videos people upload to the GoPro YouTube channel to show off the great footage they captured.

Read More

Animated whiteboard videos are the antidote for clickbait because they satisfy. Clickbait, on the other hand, is just sizzle without steak, and that does a great deal more harm than good, especially from a marketing and public relations perspective.

Clickbait is an unmistakably modern problem, but it has a long and sordid history, dating all the way back to the “yellow journalism” craze of the late 1800’s, when hysterical, exaggerated headlines were a surefire way to capture attention and convince someone to shell out their hard-earned cash for a newspaper. You know that famous expression—the more things change the more they stay the same? We’re still coping with those dumb headlines, only now they’re delivered electronically:

Read More

Find Out More